Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing (AMLaP) Conference 2014

Invited Speakers


Willem Levelt

Willem Levelt

Willem (Pim) Levelt is director emeritus of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, which he founded in 1980. He has a PhD in psychology from Leiden University (1965), was a postdoctoral research fellow at Harvard University, a visiting professor at the University of Illinois, full professor of psychology at Groningen University, member at The Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (1971-1972), professor of experimental psychology at Nijmegen University and, since 1980, scientific member of the Max Planck Society. He has published widely in psychophysics, mathematical psychology and psycholinguistics. His books include On binocular rivalry (1965), Formal grammars in linguistics and psycholinguistics (3 Vols, 1974, republished in 2008), Speaking: From intention to articulation (1989) and A history of psycholinguistics. The pre-Chomskyan era (2013). He is a member of various academies, among them the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (of which he was president from 2002 to 2005), the German Leopoldina, the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He has been awarded honorary doctorates by the universities of Maastricht, Antwerp, Padua and Louvain and is a member of the German Orden pour le mérite.


Robert Jan Hartsuiker

Robert Hartsuiker

Professor Robert Hartsuiker is Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology at Ghent University. He is currently Editor in Chief of the Journal of Cognitive Psychology and member of the board for JML, JEP:LMC, Psychological Science, LCP, Journal of Psychology.
His research interests include word and sentence production, verbal self-monitoring and speech errors, bilingualism; his research uses behavioral measurements, eye-tracking, EEG, brain-damaged patients, and computational modelling.


David Poeppel

David Poeppel

David Poeppel is a Professor of Psychology and Neural Science at NYU. His lab uses various behavioral and cognitive neuroscience approaches to study the brain basis of speech perception and language comprehension.
David trained at MIT in linguistics and cognitive neuroscience, he worked on functional brain imaging as a postdoc at UCSF. Until 2008 he directed the Cognitive Neuroscience of Language Lab at the University of Maryland. His fellowships have been at the Wissenschaftskolleg Berlin and the American Academy as well as a guest professor at many institutions. He is currently a Fellow of AAAS and has received the DaimlerChrysler Berlin Prize and other honors.


Jesse Snedeker

Jesse Snedeker

Jesse Snedeker is a Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Her research uses simple behavioral methods to study language comprehension and production in young children, people with developmental disorders, and typical adults. The guiding assumption is that linguistic theory, psycholinguistics, language development, and disordered language are different windows onto a single system, and thus data from one area is likely to constrain theories in the others. Much of her work explores how language encodes meaning and uses temporally sensitive measures (like eyetracking). Her talk will focus on the development of sentence processing and will incorporate data from a variety of populations and languages.