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The P-Workshop (The Phonetics/Phonology Workshop)

Description

The Phonetics/Phonology Workshop is the meeting series of the Phonetics and Phonology Research Group. We normally meet on Thursdays (but not every Thursday) at 1:10, in the Dugald Stewart Building, and we sometimes co-organise events with other research groups. The P-Workshop programme consists of talks, seminars and discussions on subjects relating to phonetics, phonology and speech technology.

It is organised jointly by Patrick Honeybone, James Kirby and Bert Remijsen. If you would like to give a talk, suggest a reading, or lead a session we would love to hear from you: send us an email.

Recent and upcoming events

Here is a record of current events, including those to come:

  • 13th February 2014 (13:10-14:00), room 1.17, DSB: Bert Remijsen 'Evidence for contrastive tonal alignment in Shilluk'. [Many studies hypothesize or assume that tonal alignment is not contrastive in contour tones (e.g. Hyman 1988, Odden 1995, Silverman 1997, Yip 2002). However, in a recent study on Dinka, a Western Nilotic language of South Sudan, I have presented evidence of precisely this type of configuration for falling contours, i.e., of an Early-aligned Fall being in contrast with a Late-aligned Fall (Remijsen 2013). In Dinka, the Low and the Early-aligned Fall are contextually conditioned allophones of the same phonological category. On the hypothesis that tonal alignment is contrastive in contour tones, it should be equally possible for a human language to present a contrast of Low vs. Early-aligned Fall vs. Late-aligned Fall vs. High. The realisation of such a contrast would involve the same configuration of fundamental frequency, time-shifted relative to the syllable to produce four patterns. In this talk I will present evidence of this configuration in Shilluk, another Western Nilotic language.]
  • 20th February 2014 (12:10-13:00), room 1.20, DSB: Martin Kraemer (Tromso) 'An amphichronic look at palatalization and gliding in Italian'. NOTE UNUSUAL TIME AND PLACE.
  • NB: Martin Kraemer will also be giving a short special course on Underlying Representations in Phonology open to all students and staff. There are two sessions on this: Monday 17th February (13.10-15.00) and Wednesday 19th February (13.10-15.00), both in room 1.17. All are welcome to turn up to these sessions - no booking necessary. Details are here and here.
  • 20th March 2014 (13:10-14:00), room 1.17, DSB: James Kirby 'Gestural coordination in Khmer word-initial clusters'.
  • 17th April 2014 (13:10-14:30), room 1.17, DSB: Postgraduate session: Daniel Lawrence 'How much do listeners know about phonetic variation? Investigating socio-indexical knowledge through web-based experiments'; Misnadin 'Temporal and spectral characteristics of the three-way laryngeal contrast in Madurese'; and George Starling 'Perceptual learning of vowel length categories in Japanese'.
  • 1st May 2014 (13.10-14.00), room 1.17, DSB: Bob Ladd 'Quasi-contrastive phonetic categories'. Dry run of a talk to be presented at ISSP 10 (10th International Seminar of Speech Production) in Cologne the following week - feedback needed!
  • 26th May 2014 (13.10-14.00): Rory Turnbull (Ohio State) 'Individual differences in phonetic reduction and audience design'.
  • TBC: Paper discussion session: Buizza, E. & Plug, L. (2012) 'Lenition, fortition and the status of plosive affrication: the case of spontaneous RP English /t/.' Phonology 29, 1-38.

 

Past events

Semester 1 of this year:

  • 19th September 2013 (13:10-14:00), room 1.17, DSB: Martin Corley 'Analysing ultrasound articulation data in multiple-participant experiments'.
  • 10th October 2013 (13:10-14:00), room 1.17, DSB: P-group business meeting.
  • Wednesday 16th October 2013 (13:10-14:00), room 1.17, DSB: Nigel Fabb (Strathclyde) 'Prosodic phrasing and the delivery of poetry' [note the unusual day: Wednesday, not Thursday].
  • 24th October 2013 (13:10-14:00), room 1.17, DSB: Andras Cser (PPKE, Hungary) 'The split place node hypothesis: evidence from Latin'. [This talk discusses the hypothesis, going back to the early 1990’s and couched in different models in different ways since then, that in feature geometry the place features of consonants and the place features of vowels occupy different slots and/or are dominated by different higher-level nodes. Analyses of a number of phenomena from Latin are adduced in support of such a model, e.g. assimilations between consonants and vowels, the behaviour and diachronic development of gn-initial stems and the allomorphy displayed by the prefix con-.]
  • NB: Andras Cser will also be giving two special seminars open to students and staff - details below. 
  • 14th November 2013 (13:10-14:00), room 1.17, DSB: Rosey Billington (University of Melbourne) 'The sound system of Lopit'. [Ths talk will provide an overview of the sound system of Lopit, an un(der)described Eastern Nilotic language traditionally spoken in South Sudan. Following a description of the segmental and tonal phonology, I turn to the phonological and phonetic evidence for an 'advanced tongue root' type contrast among Lopit vowels, presenting experimental results of investigations into some of their acoustic and durational properties. Results show good evidence for such a contrast, but also indicate that a number of different cues are involved, and speakers may use these to different extents.]
  • 5th December 2013 (13:10-14:00), room 1.17, DSB: Natalia Zharkova (QMU) 'Articulatory constraints in child speech: ultrasound tongue imaging and acoustic evidence'.

Special seminars

  • 23rd October 2013 (14:10-16:00), room 3.10 then 3.11, DSB: Andras Cser (PPKE, Hungary) Issues in the phonological description of dead languages: case studies from Latin. [This talk discusses some preliminary methodological issues of the phonological and phonetic description of dead languages. Then case studies are presented from Latin that exemplify some interesting points either in terms of data or in terms of phonological interpretation. Depending on time, the case studies will include lateral dissimilation, variable assimilation at morpheme boundaries, contour segments vs. clusters and sequences (labiovelars, diphthongs), extrasyllabicity and resyllabification.]
  • 25th October 2013 (15:10-17:00), room 1.17, DSB: Andras Cser (PPKE, Hungary) Phonology and morphology in the nineteenth century: the issue of abstractness vs. empiricism [This talk discusses the changing roles of phonology and morphology throughout the nineteenth century and the way the focus shifted from the latter to the former beginning with the 1870’s, one of the most remarkable periods in the development of modern linguistics. This shift was a very important aspect of the Paleogrammarian-Neogrammarian transition, an aspect that has not so far got the attention it deserves. It is also closely connected to the role abstraction played in the work of the different generations of linguists. The open conflict between the Paleogrammarians and the Neogrammarians as well as the latent conflict between the Neogrammarians and de Saussure was partly grounded in different perceptions of what constituted unwarranted abstraction, an issue that is still very much with us in linguistics.]

P-Workshop Mailing List

Information about P-Workshop events is sent to the P-Workshop mailing list. To subscribe, send an email to any one of the pworkshop organisers listed above.

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